Portchester D ware – request for information

Katie Mountain is an MA student at Newcastle University, working on a study under the supervision of SGRP member Dr James Gerrard on Portchester D/Overwey white ware. Katie is looking at the distribution of the ware and would like information on further find spots to determine the extent of its distribution.

Katie has reasonable coverage of the south-east and is now looking for outliers, in particular in areas such as Gloucestershire, Shropshire, Midlands, East Anglia/Fenland. The ware appears as far north-west as Wroxeter and east into Colne Fen, and Katie is now searching now for sites in between.

While there may be issues with potential lack of recognition outside the general distribution area and with the various fabric aliases, and any information on find spots within the areas stated above would be greatly appreciated and acknowledged.

If anyone has information, please email Katie by 15th December. Click here for contact details. Click here for more details about the ware.

SGRP Conference 2018 – timetable and registration details

Study Group for Roman Pottery Annual Conference
Saturday 16th June – Sunday 17th June 2018

Venue: The King’s Centre, Osney Mead, Oxford

Theme: Late Roman Pottery and other ceramic matters

This year the SGRP conference will be a one-day conference with an optional second day and is being held at the Kings Centre, Osney Mead, Oxford, OX2 0ES. This is easily accessible by car and train and is located close to Oxford Archaeology. On Saturday we will combining lectures with pottery handling and a ‘pottery ‘road-show’ where you can bring along your query colour-coats and we can disagree as to what they are. On the Sunday we will arrange a guided tour of North Leigh Roman villa from where we will go to Woodstock where there are plenty of eating places to suit all pockets followed by the opportunity to visit the Oxfordshire Museum at Woodstock before returning to Oxford.

Click the link below to download the timetable, venue and accommondation details and the registration form:

SGRP Conference Oxford 2018: Timetable and registration (pdf)

 

An interesting pottery query

An interesting query came through to Study Group members by way of website’s comment form. Keith Lowndes, a member of the South Oxfordshire Archaeological Group (SOAG), asked:

“I was wondering if you could advise me as to a contact relating to a translation of a motto on a Trier motto beaker. It has the letters ‘A M A N T I D A’. We cannot match it to any motto. Various suggestions for a translation have been put forward – ‘I/they love to give’, ‘Give to your lover’. Any help would be appreciated.”

The vessel in question had been found on a site excavated by SOAG in Oxfordshire, and the query was circulated to Study Group members. Responses soon came in thick and fast.

The Rhenish ware beaker from Trier found by SOAG’s Anne Strick. Photo: (c) SOAG

“…it is to do with drinking to a girlfriend. ‘Here’s looking at you baby’ for older readers. I suppose ‘Give to the loving’ literally.”
“‘Da’ is the singular of the command form meaning ‘give’, which can be placed either first or last. The word ‘amanti’ does not signify gender of the person ‘loving’, but it is in the dative case, meaning therefore to the person loving = ‘to the lover’. The word ‘your’ may be presumed, and therefore it may be translated, ‘Give to your lover’ – whatever his/her gender.”
“AMANTI (dative of amans, lover) DA (imperative of dato/dare, to give), so ‘Give to the lover!’, as already suggested.”
“I read the inscription DA AMANTI and agree with [the] translation: ‘Give to your lover’.”
“’DA’ can to be understood in an erotic or in an ambiguous sense. The imperative ‘DA’ has more often this context on the Trierer Spruchbecher, for example ‘DA MI(hi)’.”
“This is definitely the two words ‘amanti da’: ‘give to a lover’ (or ‘give to your lover’).”
“The question is, who is being addressed, a giver or a receiver? It doesn’t say ‘give me’ or ‘give this’, though that seems to be the meaning. But there could also be innuendo here, since the phrase can mean ‘grant it to your lover’”

Thank you to everyone who responded, and thank you, too, to Keith Lowndes for getting in touch. Keith has also drawn our attention to another Rhenish ware beaker found by SOAG. This second vessel is on the SOAG website and can be viewed in 3D.

Carlisle 2017: A view of the SGRP conference

The annual conference of the Study Group for Roman Pottery was held this year at Tullie House Museum in Carlisle. During a weekend in July, delegates heard talks on Roman pottery from Carlisle, other sites in north-west England, and the results of work on larger projects, both in Britain and abroad.

There was also a visit to the Roman fort of Vindolanda, where delegates were treated to a guided tour by Andrew Birley, CEO of The Vindolanda Trust, and the firing of a replica Roman kiln, built by experimental archaeologist and potter, Graham Taylor. There was just about time, too, for a walk along the wall from Gilsland to Birdoswald on Hadrian’s Wall.

Every year at the conference, the John Gillam Prize is awarded to a piece of recent work that has made an important contribution to Roman pottery studies. This year’s prize was awarded to Edward Biddulph, Joyce Compton and Scott Martin for their work on the late Iron Age and Roman assemblage from Elms Farm, Heybridge.

By all accounts, the conference was a great success. Thanks are owed to the staff of the Tullie House Museum for hosting the conference, and to Stephen Wadeson, supported by the SGRP Committee, for organising the weekend.

Conference gallery (photos by David Bird, Diana Briscoe, Joyce Compton, and Stephen Wadeson)

The tour of Vindolanda

The Kiln firing

SGRP Conference 2017: Tullie House, Carlisle

The SGRP 2017 conference will be held at Tullie House in Carlisle from Friday 14th July to Sunday 16th July. Over the weekend we hope to address several themes, including Roman pottery from North-West Britain and pottery from other larger projects. There will also be a visit to the Hadrian’s Wall World Heritage site.

The Committee would like to invite 20 minute papers on recent or current pottery research. While we hope for a particular emphasis on material from the North of Britain, all contributions will be considered. Anyone wishing to give a paper is asked to provide a title and submit a short abstract of c 100-200 words to the Secretary by 31st January 2017.

Further details about the conference will be posted in due course.

Out now: A Standard for Pottery Studies in Archaeology

Standard_Pottery_StudiesPottery is one of the most common artefacts recovered from archaeological excavations. While it is widely regarded as a reliable tool for dating, pottery is also significant as evidence for technology, tradition, modes of distribution, patterns of consumption, and site formation processes.

But when simple, basic tasks have not been carried out, and the true value of an assemblage has not been understood, the potential for missing important information is too great. With that in mind, A Standard for Pottery Studies in Archaeology takes the reader through the various stages of an archaeological project, from planning and data collection through to report writing and archiving, with the intention of informing not only pottery specialists but also those who manage and monitor projects.

This Standard, produced with funding from Historic England, was compiled by the Prehistoric Ceramics Research Group, the Study Group for Roman Pottery and the Medieval Pottery Research Group, with the aim of creating the first comprehensive, inclusive standard for working with pottery. It is intended for use in all types of archaeological project, including those run by community groups, professional contractors and research institutions.

Click here to download a copy of A Standard for Pottery Studies in Archaeology.

Case for joint standards in pottery studies made in new volume

Insight_from_Innovation_coverThe Insight from Innovation conference, held in honour of David Peacock, provided an opportunity for representatives of the three main pottery groups (SGRP, PCRG and MPRG) to collaborate on a joint paper in honour of David Peacock. The paper reflected on Peacock’s contribution to pottery studies and reviewed some strengths and weaknesses of current practice. This collaboration was itself a significant innovation, for, although sharing many of the same interests, methods and concerns, the three period groups have typically functioned in isolation.

The principal objectives of the published paper were to emphasise shared ambitions and methodologies and to advocate the case for a joint guidance document that would press for appropriate standards of analysis to be maintained, and for innovation to be fostered, in the face of increasing commercial pressures. The collaboration forged between the three groups, while working on this paper, resulted in the production of the joint pottery standards, which have now been published.

The paper, ‘Hold your beliefs lightly’: Innovation and best practice in Prehistoric, Roman and post-Roman ceramic studies in Britain, by Jane Evans, Duncan Brown and David Knight, can be downloaded here.

Insight from Innovation: New Light on Archaeological Ceramics, edited by Emilie Sibbesson, Ben Jervis and Sarah Coxon, is published by Oxbow Books. Click here for more details.